Posts Tagged 'FO'

More Purple

I finally got around to taking pictures of the fuzzy purple scarf too. I really enjoyed knitting with this Kidsilk Haze.  Such a luxurious treat!

The details:

Yarn:  70% mohair and 30% silk; see above!

Needles: US #9

Pattern:  Invisible Stripe Scarf by lupinbunny

I cast on 25 stitches for a 6″ wide scarf and went until I had 40″ (accessory size).  Using my excellent new digital scale – whee! – I got 11.5 grams for this scarf.  That’s just shy of half a ball, so two friends could split a ball of this fancy yarn.  (By the way, I see Knit Picks has introduced a similar yarn called Aloft.  Will try it sometime!)

This pattern is basically garter stitch (all K stitches) except that every now and then you do a row with 3 wraps for every K stitch.  On the next row, you drop 2 of the wraps and knit a Very Big stitch to get back to your original stitch count.   You can choose however many K rows you want between the fancy rows.   I did the two rows described plus 4 more.  You can do 2 wraps instead of 3.  If you vary the number of wraps, you can get something like this:

Out of the Haze

Finished at last!  This will look nice under a jacket (air conditioning, you know).  I’m pleased with the fit, since I reduced it a LOT from the pattern (believed my own gauge and glad I did!).

Here’s the summary:

Yarn: Knit Picks Simply Cotton (organic worsted weight) in the Haze Heather colorway.

Needles: US #6

Pattern: Summer Tee Top by Claudia Olson (you’ll need a Ravelry login for the link).

I deviated from the pattern in the following ways:

– I reduced the cast-on by 28 stitches in order to get 36″ using my gauge.  Others on Ravelry noted that their tops came out on the large side which gave me the confidence to go with such a big modification!

– When it came time to bind off for the arms, I shifted the bound-off stitches to the center of the underarm (3 on either side of the marker).

– I struggled a little with following the directions for shaping AND keeping in pattern.  I ended up following them in spirit and doing what I thought was sensible to keep the stitch pattern tidy.

– The directions didn’t spell it out, but when the sleeves get to their final width of 16 stitches, there will only be half of the stitch pattern left (for me, it was the YO K1 YO part).  I added a K1 SSK at the beginning and a K2TOG K1 at the end of the pattern row (makes up for the lost double-decrease and keeps the fabric straight).

This was the first time I had occasion to try a 3-needle bind-off.  What a nice tidy way to finish!  Much better than sewing a seam.  Indeed, it allows me to say that this top is totally seamless.

I’m already scheming out the next one, stay tuned.

FO: Cotswold Walkers

Wow, it only took two weeks to complete these socks!  They were essentially a 2×2 ribbed sock with a 3-stitch cable-like design replacing some of the ribs.  I made them from the toe up, using a Magic Cast-on, a heel with gusset on the bottom and the EZ sewn bind-off at the top.  The heel flap was just a continuation of the ribbing pattern.  These socks have 30 iterations of the 4-row pattern.  I would say the leg of the sock is just the right length.  I would shorten the foot by 1 or two patterns if I made these again (my feet are short for my height!). 

I named these socks to evoke an imagined walking tour in the Lake District of England.  Maybe someday they will take the actual tour (hopefully with me in them)!  In the meantime, here they are inside my walking sandals.  Not the best choice when a couple of feet of snow are on the ground, but it’s good for photos.  Note: be extremely wary of the velcro if you want to wear hand-knit socks with shoes like these!

Another note: I ended the sock after row 1 of the pattern (the part where the “crossover” occurs) because I thought it would look prettiest.  It does … BUT … I forgot that this row actually decreases the total stitch count.  When I bound off, I was puzzled to notice that the top of the sock was kind of snug.  “But I used the very flexible EZ sewn bind-off, which never fails!” I muttered.  Then I realized my error:  the sock has 6 fewer stitches after that row.  That’s maybe an inch of circumference lost!  So next time, I will stop after row 4 when all stitches have been restored and settled in.

If you want to use this pretty stitch pattern in place of a rib in your favorite sock pattern, here it is:

use in place of a stockinette rib:

R1: S1 K2 PSSO  (this decreases from 3 stitches to 2)

R2: K1 YO K1 (this puts the missing stitch back, creating the hole in the middle)

R3: K3

R4: K3

(PSSO means to pass the slipped stitch over the two stitches just knitted.)

This is JUST the stitch pattern.  It could replace the K3 in a 3X3 ribbing (K3 P3), or use it wherever you want. Just put some purl or garter stitch on either side to show it off.  If you use it to replace a 2-stitch rib, don’t forget that this will increase the stitch count of your sock circumference unless you compensate elsewhere. The above instructions are for knitting in the round (all sides are the right side!).  I had to knit flat for the heel flap.  The instructions for that are:

R1 (RS): S1 K2 PSSO  (this decreases from 3 stitches to 2)

R2: P1 YO P1 (this puts the missing stitch back, creating the hole in the middle)

R3: K3

R4: P3

FO: Blackrose Socks

These were a pleasure to knit … the pattern was satisfying even though it wasn’t too challenging!

I used KnitPicks Stroll Kettle Dyed yarn in the “Auburn” colorway … the subtle color variations are easy to appreciate in the plain parts of this pattern.  At the same time, the color changes don’t interfere with the lacey parts!  The pattern itself comes from Knitty.  I kept the spirit of this pattern but modified it in the following ways:

– I made the 2×2 ribbing on the cuff longer because I thought a sock with lots of stockinette could use a little extra elasticity at the top.

– I started with 64 stitches but reduced the leg by 4 stitches about halfway down for the same reason: I wanted to keep the lace stretched out as the leg got narrower.

– I ditched the short row heel for a regular flap-and-gusset arrangement.  This is just a personal preference; no comment on the original pattern.

Here’s a picture of the leg shaping and the heel flap:

I reduced the circumference by 4 stitches (from 64 to 60) about halfway down the leg in the back.  For fun, I chose a unique stitch pattern for the heel flap: the “fluted fabric stitch” with two garter stitches at the beginning and end of each row.

These socks were fun and I can’t wait to wear them!

Catching up!

Some recent things:

– I finished the Norblu Sweater and gave it to Jim for Christmas.  Here he is wearing it:

As I feared, it’s a little more snug than he prefers, but I think he may wear it anyway!

Somewhere along the way, I made a couple of hats too … I made a Tricorder (see “Free Patterns”) with yarn leftover from last Christmas:

 

And I experimented with a new stitch pattern for a Random Hat:

 

Finally, I started a new pair of socks, using a pattern called Blackrose:

Sorry for the hodgepodge approach but today’s the first time back on my “home” computer after a malware attack!  The experts’ idea of solving the problem was to wipe my entire computer clean and reinstall the original software, oy …

FO: Esther Socks

You probably thought the Esther socks were finished a long time ago, right?  I mean, one sock just needed to be woven in and the other just needed about 2 inches of toe.  But no.  I’ve been so busy with many, many new English-teaching responsibilities that knitting has limped along at a very slow pace!  However, I did get some time alone with the Esther socks at last … and here they are!

This was the most difficult stitch pattern I’ve ever attempted … lace AND cables AND lots of twisted stitches.  Very effective, though.  And on Monday, I will be giving these socks away, buh-bye!  I hope the new owner enjoys wearing them!  Here’s another picture:

The patttern is available for free on Ravelry.  It’s by Stephanie van der Linden and it’s called “Esther”.  I used size 1 1/2 US needles and Zwerger Garn Opal sock yarn (colorway 1418).  I used an Eye of Partridge heel with garter stitch border.  In addition to the interesting lace pattern, the picot edging at the cuff was new to me.  It’s charming and I’ve since used the foldover hem technique (no picot) on a sweater for hubby.  That’s almost finished … see my next post!

FO: True Blue Tesselators

After 2.5 iterations of the decorative pattern on the leg, one extra round of K, 14 rounds of 2×2 ribbing (same height as half the decorative pattern) and EZ’s sewn bind-off … ta da!

I’m very happy with the fit and I love the drama of the pattern.  If you make this sock, make sure there’s a bit of negative ease all around or the lace won’t show well.  The cool zigzag of the stitches won’t show as well either.  Here’s a pic that captures that:

As noted in earlier posts, these are a toe-up version of a cuff-down pattern called “Tesselating Lace Socks”.  The pattern is available as a free pdf download at Ravelry.  I’ve given detailed notes here on how I did the toe-up version.  I can’t wait to wear these when the weather gets cooler!

I’ve been messing with the next project too:

Sampler Notes

One of these is the ad-libbed pattern from the gauge swatch, the others are ideas for mix-and-match.  I surfed free patterns at Ravelry to get these ideas.  There’s one of songbirds which is too excellent to pass up … I didn’t write it out here, but I’m pretty sure it will be a part of this project!  I will credit whatever projects I “borrowed” from when all is said and done, though I think most of these are traditional.


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